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(Music Licensing Update) Libraries Are Biased!

Posted by on May 9, 2013 in Case Studies, Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 5 comments

(Music Licensing Update) Libraries Are Biased!

  You ever wonder why music libraries refuse to pitch certain genres of music? Not every library of course, but there are those that do. Throughout this licensing course I’ve run into 40+ libraries that wont accept anything outside of Rock, Jazz and Country. Why is this? Why limit potential income? The answer is simple: They either dislike the genre, have too much of it or don’t understand it. Allow me to go into a little more detail.   They Dislike The Genre Everyone’s entitled to their own opinions and tastes. I once asked a library owner why she didn’t accept Dubstep. The lady kindly replied with “I just don’t like it, and it’s hard for me to pitch music I’m not passionate about” Nothing wrong with that, to each their own. For others it’s a dislike of working with the genre, a perfect example here would be hip hop. It’s a pet peeve to most because it’s hard to tell if the music is really “sample free”. Libraries may love the sound, but not the risk. I know some of you are thinking “There’s dishonestly in every genre”. I totally agree, but the chances of a rock group or country producer/singer sampling another musician’s material is rare compared to producers in electronic based genres.   Already Have Enough Sometimes the library has too much of a certain genre so they put a freeze on it and focus more on what they don’t have. I understand that concept, running a library is no different that running any other business. Let’s take Dairy Queen for an example. Last time I checked, they’ve transformed into more of a fast food chain! They can’t survive on 1 flavor or ice cream alone. These days they sell a little bit of everything: Ice cream (lots of flavors), toppings, burgers and fries, smoothies, sandwiches etc. They’ve expanded over the years.   Lack Of Education Or Exposure I remember being at a convention (ASCAP) a few years ago and a music supervisor told me he’d shop anything except hiphop and was currently in need of Urban Sounding Music. So, me being me….needing clarification and all, I asked what he meant by Urban music. The supervisor then rattled off 7 iconic hiphop artist as references! Turns out ‘hiphop’ in his mind, is whats playing on the radio. It’s amazing how radio can influence one’s perception of an entire genre. Others just don’t care about what’s circulating. I mean, some people still think country music’s sound is limited to Dolly Parton and Garth Brooks. I’m sure there are other reasons, but these are the main ones I run into whenever I inquire.  ...

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Music Licensing: Bouncing Back From Rejection

Posted by on Apr 17, 2013 in Case Studies, Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 6 comments

Music Licensing: Bouncing Back From Rejection

Hey all, here I am with another 90 Day Music Licensing Challenge update. If you’ve been following along you’ll remember a post I made about my demos being rejected as well as why they were rejected. Here’s a quick follow up to that post outlining my corrective actions and the results I’ve received from them.   Tracks/Demo Sounds Too Short The libraries that rejected my demo due to it’s length have now been sent full versions of each track (in the demo). I just spiced them up a little. I added an intro, outro and altered versions of the hook and verse. This didn’t take long, maybe 10 minutes per track I’m actually glad I took the time to rework the demo because it brought forth more ideas, more inspiration. The more inspiration the better, can never have too much of it.   Dealing With Corrupt Files Long story short, I re-uploaded the demo and received confirmation emails within minutes. Then it hit me, I didn’t even bother checking for confirmations the 1st go round. Most of the time the confirmation is an automated response. I was getting so many I just assumed they everything went through. So much for assuming. How’d The Files Get Corrupt? They didn’t upload completely. Between uploading the demos, project files and updating my site, there was a connection glitch somewhere. The project files uploaded fine, I’m sure the client would have notified me if there was an issue. I took a little time to go through my server logs (uploading history) and found 6 files that were incomplete, each 50-70 megs. Now, I’d expect this issue with the project files because they’re a lot bigger (1-2 gigs each), not so much with smaller files, but what can you do? These things happen.   Results (Positive/Negative) In short, a handful of libraries have now accepted my demo and sent over their licensing contracts/terms. Most were even willing to confirm and give feedback instantly via phone/Skype. There was a little manipulation with this process. I contacted the library(s) and told them I had issues uploading in the past and just wanted to make sure that everything went through smoothly. Not really manipulation, but more so taking full advantage of my situation. This was perfect because It put them in a position where they had to listen to the demo. Well, they didn’t have to, but they did. The next step from there was for them to send over contracts and terms. Most did this while I was on the phone with them. No reason not to, they’re already at the computer (listening to the demo). Now, I wasn’t able to get everyone on the phone, but will over the next week or 2. Do understand, these companies have a lot going on. Just because someone has a phone/email doesn’t mean they’re a slave to it.  ...

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(Music Licensing) Patience Is A Virtue

Posted by on Apr 2, 2013 in Case Studies, Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 3 comments

(Music Licensing) Patience Is A Virtue

  This is update #7 of the 90 Day Music Licensing Challenge Case Study. In this update I share my experience with time frames, patience and what you should expect/what you will run into in the licensing world.   Things Take Time It would be great if everything happened when we wanted. If everyone was ‘johnny on the spot’ when it came to our needs and wants, but it doesn’t work that way, at least not for most of us.   Music Licensing Professionals (Libraries/Supervisors) Throughout the challenge I’ve come across different response times. Some libraries got in touch with me the same day I submitted my demo, some within 72 hours and others a month or 2 later. In fact, there are still libraries and supervisors who have yet to give me a response. I can’t even begin to imagine what their day to day routine consists of. In the end it really boils down to what the person on the other end has on their plate. If they have time to respond, they will, if not, it could take a while. In my experience, a follow up email or friendly phone call normally does the trick. You don’t want to annoy anyone, but you do want to follow up from time to time.   Song/Track Placements (Supervisors/Libraries) Most industry professionals you contact will be in the middle of working on projects with strict deadlines. Your priority might be building rapport/getting your music heard. Their priority is completing project(s) they’ve been contracted to complete. On top of projects, they have a ton of music and emails to sift through. You have to take this into consideration when conversing with libraries and supervisors. Side note: Just because someone likes your music doesn’t mean they have a use for it. Music Libraries – Some libraries assist with the pitching of your tunes and others don’t. Regardless of which you’re involved with it comes down to “content colliding with opportunity”. People can pitch your music all day, but if it doesn’t fit, it doesn’t fit. The same goes for search engine based libraries (like Getty Images/Music). The buyer’s are looking for something specific. If you don’t have what they need, it’s off to the next composer/artist. In this line of work it’s about what fits best, not who works harder.   Collecting Royalty Payments Performing Rights Organizations are responsible for collecting/sending you royalty payments. Royalty payments are generally paid out every quarter and that’s assuming all the paper work is filed correctly. I remember someone ranting about PROs because they take so long to notify you about your music once it’s used. I understand the frustration,but there are thousands of accounts that are being handled. It’s much easier to update everyone at the same time. The more errors/incomplete data submitted to the PROs the longer it takes to receive payments. I’ve been in situations where I’ve waited over a year due to filing errors. It sucks, but it is what it is. The point I’m trying to make here, is nothing happens overnight, everything has a process....

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How To Send A Demo CD

Posted by on Mar 12, 2013 in Case Studies, Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 9 comments

How To Send A Demo CD

  I’m back with another update on the 90 Day Music Licensing Challenge. Since my last post I’ve been busy organizing tutorials and balancing sound design projects. – It’s frustrating at times, but worth it.   Anyway, enough about that, let’s get up to speed with this case study shall we?   What’s With The Bubble Mailers What’s With The Bubble Mailers Oh that…Well, I’m sending off CD submissions to both Pumpaudio and licensing companies who had strict “submission” policies (ie CD only). I’m not a huge fan of snail mail, but you gotta do what you gotta do. Here’s a little insight on mailing CD submissions (or how I go about doing it)   Selecting the Tracks For me, this is a simple process. I just go through my folders and select x amount of tracks that haven’t been sent before and that’s really about it. I have a nice little method for keep track of this which I will share in the near future. I try to keep my music well organized. There’s a folder for each genre of music (that I create) and sub folders (within the genre folder) that bare names of movies/TV shows. These sub-folders contain music that fit the corresponding movie/TV show. In this case I chose 200 instrumentals – 25 from 8 genres. Most of these were the “30 minute” tracks I’ve been making on a daily basis. I find that the more variety I have in Pumpaudio’s catalog the better. I put a little more thought into the tracks I sent to the leads. I paid close attention to what genre’s each specialized in. Some companies were upfront about this on their site and others I had to contact and ask. Once I had the information needed I went through my folders and picked 5 tracks (yes just 5). I only selected 5 because these are new ventures/business relationships for me. I don’t know if they have an online pile they put the music in or if they catalog music the old fashioned way – I don’t know how they operate! I figure 5 tracks is enough for them to base a decision on.   File Formats (Important) When it comes to file formats, raw always trumps compressed files. I always delivery a 48khz/24bit Wav file unless advised otherwise. Some clients will request Mp3’s and if that’s the case, give them what they want. There’s nothing wrong with this, just make sure you send them a high quality Mp3 file along with the wav file. I send a wav file (along with the mp3) just in case. I’ve had a lot of people thank me for supplying both. I remember 1 client insulted me saying (With one condescending tone) “No, Mp3 is the universal standard sir. Why do you think they make Mp3 players?” – Some things you have gotta laugh at   Submission Delivery CD Submission 101 Quick Note – Never send unsolicited material/always copyright your work.   Do not write on CD with marker (looks unprofessional) Make sure your content is burned on the CD Make sure CD works/plays Place printed label with your contact info on CD Send 1 sheet or cover letter w/CD Send package to the correct address Make sure you can pay for shipping   This...

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Music Licensing Success → (Finally Paid)

Posted by on Feb 21, 2013 in Case Studies, Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 20 comments

Music Licensing Success  →  (Finally Paid)

  Exactly 14 days ago I posted an update about the success I had following Aaron’s 90 Day Music Licensing Course. Now if you remember, that post was a little pre mature as I hadn’t been paid, they were just opportunities that I decided to follow up on. Well, all that has recently changed I’m happy to announce that my tracks have been placed and the payments have cleared!… There was a lot of back and forth with negotiations, but it all panned out in my favor. Let’s expose the inner workings that turned these opportunities into cash deals.   90 Day Music Licensing Course The course (as I’ve stated before) gives you what you need to know to jump in and get the ball rolling and earn some money. There are training videos, interviews and best of all direct contact with the man behind the course. If you’re stuck on something he’ll help you every step of the way. I feel these 2 deals would have never been presented to me had I not used the material in Aaron’s course. Side note – Even as a person with experience in licensing I might not have found these opportunities w/out the course.   Having A Payment Processor I chose Paypal as a payment processor for 1 main reason → IT’S SIMPLE TO USE! It doesn’t matter what country you or your client(s) lives in. If you’re using Paypal you’re setup to receive payments from anywhere. Your client doesn’t even need to have an account, they just need internet access and the ability to follow simple instructions. Another great thing about using Paypal is it easily integrates with multiple platforms such as: Websites, social media, email, smart phones, widgets etc   Music Supervisors (David & Judi) This was not shot in the dark, I didn’t send music to a pool and pray the best – Like you do with “pay to submit” based companies. I feel the music supervisors played a huge role in getting my tracks placed because they were directly connected with the project. You have to understand, it’s their job to find music that fit the client’s project as well as negotiate terms/pay on the composer’s (or music supplier’s) behalf.   The Music/The Material I don’t want to start a quality vs quantity argument here, but I feel having a lot of material on hand played an important role in landing these placements. 1) I had a lot of material that fit the criteria of the project 2) Lot’s of inspiration/source material to pull from The culmination of both contributed to a fast turn around time (can’t argue that). I either had tracks that were perfect or tracks that needed alterations before submitting. All instrumentals were sent as LoFi Mp3’s via Dropbox and later replaced with HQ Wav files upon acceptance.   Contracts & Negotiations Here’s where I felt things got a little sticky. You see, landing the placement is easy as long as the price is right, but I didn’t want to sell myself short nor did I want my experience to distort the case study. Keep in mind I’m approaching this thing as a newbie as best as I can without endangering the rights of my music. The original terms/pay were good, but I wanted...

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Music Licensing Success (After 1 Month)

Posted by on Feb 6, 2013 in Case Studies, Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 27 comments

Music Licensing Success (After 1 Month)

  So it’s been a little over a month since I started the 90 Day Music Licensing Challenge (1 month 3 days to be exact), and since there have been some interesting things in works. In Aaron’s course he gives you a lot of how to(s), scripts and insight which are very useful especially to someone new to music licensing. Over the last month I’ve done nothing but use Aaron’s scripts (as basis for my own) and leads. Some of these leads require a demo to be sent either Mp3/upload or physical CD. Quick Suggestion – If you were linked to this page, start from the beginning and go through to the end of the case study – Start here I’ve purposely ignored CD submissions because I’d like to send those all out at once rather than sporadically. I’ve also been submitting my demo(s) everywhere (that I see fit) and cuing up tracks to upload into the libraries I’ve been accepted into. I’ve also request libraries to consider my demo before allowing me to submit to their library. Some libraries don’t require a demo, this isn’t due to lack of quality control, this is simply the way they operate. I hate spinning my wheels, I like to know if my material is what the company/library needs (quality wise). I contacted each library and asked if I could send a demo in anyway. To date there hasn’t been 1 library that has told me “no you can’t send a demo”. I went out on a limb and emailed those who stated they only accepted CD submissions and asked if I could send mp3s (for demo purposes). Some said “no”, others said “yes”. I’m just really against sending in CDs unless I know for sure that’s it’s going to added to the library.   1 Month…. 62 songs… Still Not Enough! If you’ve been following my blog you’d know about the my New Years Resolution of submitting 1000 tracks to music libraries. Well, in the month of January I was able to create 62 songs, if you do the math that’s only 2 tracks a day (not many). 2 x 31 = 62 ….62 x 12 = 744. That’s not too far off from 1000, but still not 1000. There are 7 months that contain 31 days, 1 (February) has 28 and the rest have 30. So by the math given If I stick to 2 tracks a day I wont reach my goal. I’m fine with 744 as I have plenty of music in my arsenal to make up the difference with, but I’m going to pretend that I don’t. In order to pump out 1000 tracks by the end of the year I’m going to need to create 3 tracks per day (3 x 365 = 1080). That’s going to be 1,064 for me though because I screwed up the month of Jan.   Here’s My Workflow – Creative Process! Well, the process I use is quite simple. Start off with an 8 bar hook and from the hook I create the: Verse, intro and breakdown or build up. I’m not working with a vocalist or collaborating with anyone, nor am I trying to create the next big hit, so the track is done whenever I say it’s done....

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90Day Music Licensing Challenge (Playing Catch Up)

Posted by on Jan 16, 2013 in Case Studies, Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 6 comments

90Day Music Licensing Challenge (Playing Catch Up)

So we’re 2 weeks into the 90 Day Music Licensing Challenge and I’m finally caught up! Since the last update a lot of things have changed, both with the challenge and my own personal business endeavors. I’ve had to alter my work-flow as well as the way I approach the licensing game.   Playing Catch Up With The Challenge The 1st thing I had to drill in on was creating new demos. I’ve been using the same 2-3 demos over and over for the last couple of years and felt it was time for something new. Creating these new demos would also add to the 1000 songs I’ll be submitting to libraries throughout the year – Goals For 2013. I spent 1 week doing nothing but studying and creating music. The 1st half of the week I spent immersing myself in popular music (genre didn’t matter). When I was driving around town I had the radio on. When I was at home, I had the latest/popular TV/Movies on and I was actively taking notes. My notes consisted of: Instruments, tempo, genre, how the song made me feel and how it related to the scene. The 2nd half of the week I spent creating music. I stuck with a 4/4 time signature because it’s the easiest to create in and I needed to get a lot done in a short amount of time. I also setup a small window of time to work in for each track – 30 minutes, no more no less. I did this because I’m most productive with short deadlines, It forces me to only bring forth what works. Now, I’m sure a lot of you don’t agree with this, but different strokes for different folks I guess. Once I was done, I had roughly 20 tracks ready to go, each with 1:20-2min of run-time.   Creating My Demo Last week I received 24 emails inquiring about demo creation and how I go about creating mine. In all honestly, I just picked 4 tracks. I don’t worry about teasers or ordering the tracks from best to…least best/pretty ok etc. I just selected 4 tracks and sent them on their merry way. – Please don’t over complicate this process.   Submitting My Demo(s) I went back through all of my emails (Aaron sends out a lead per day) and really dug into the libraries. The goal is to submit to 1 lead per day which is easy to do. Each company had different terms when it came to submission (some which I wasn’t prepared for). I made sure I went through the licensing contracts before agreeing to them – A mistake a lot of people make (not reading contracts thoroughly) This is not like reading licensing terms of software, where you just scroll and click then install. These terms can have a huge impact on your career so it makes sense to read them. Reading terms was boring, but necessary. I noticed that not all companies were the same nor did each company outline their contact/terms on their site and some terms were a little too simplistic and open ended which left me with a lot of questions. I had to personally email/call these companies and dig a little deeper into their contract with them, 2 actually...

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The Challenge Started I’m Already Behind

Posted by on Jan 6, 2013 in Case Studies, Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 16 comments

The Challenge Started I’m Already Behind

  The 90 Day Music Licensing Challenge officially started Jan 2nd, 2013. I received an email containing my login/password aswell as a run down of how the course operates. I wasn’t able to dive into the course at the time, so I just checked to see if everything worked (if I could access the course etc).   After giving the course a quick glance, I contacted Aaron to schedule my initial consultation. We were able to set one up for Jan 4th, (2013) 12pm EST.   My Consultation With Aaron Davison The consultation went well, I was able share my experiences (good and bad) as well as what type of production I was most comfortable with. What I loved most was Aaron’s honesty, his answers were unbiased and made good business sense. I also liked the fact that Aaron was humble, he didn’t come off as a know it all he was just… a normal person. After the consultation, I went over to the main training section of the course. The layout is pretty simple, there is a list of tutorials that tell you everything you need to know to get started with licensing music as well as bonus interviews, checklist sheets, directories etc. The guy pretty much put his blueprint in video tutorial format and there are daily emails which contain leads where we can send our music (which I’m 4 days behind on). What’s reassuring is the fact that I have a personal connection with a few of the leads he’s already supplied and they all require a production demo. That’s good, that tells me there’s  quality control and that Aaron isn’t just tossing out bullshit leads I’ll be creating a brand new demo for these leads. Why? Eh, like I said before the start of this case study, I’ll be starting from scratch.   Portable Music Production Setup Now, I’ll be using a basic production setup for this challenge and when I say basic… I mean basic, just a laptop, midi controller, 1 application, audio interface and a pair of headphones etc. Everything listed below can fit in a backpack, and that’s vital because I need to mobile. My best ideas come to me when I’m outside of the recording studio.   The Midi Controller(s) Akai LPK 25: I got this controller as a gift in 2010, it’s not the “best” midi controller as far as user feel or features, but it’s perfect for what I need it for – Which is creating music. It’s a lot smaller than most 25 key midi controllers and the build is cheap (feels a like a toy), but again it’s more than enough to get the job done and it fits in my backpack Akai LPD 8: Much like the Lpk 25, but instead of keys it has 8 pads. Wasn’t sure if I wanted to lay out my drum patterns with keys or pads, so I chose both.   My Audio Interface Saffire 6 USB: I like this interface because of it’s “sound quality” and it’s affordable. Most interfaces of this quality grade cost an extra $100.00 sometimes even more depending on what you’re looking at. The preamps on Saffire 6 are the exact same preamps used on their higher end interfaces. This is great because most interfaces skimp on the...

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Music Licensing Challenge: How Many Placements Will I Get In 90 Days?

Posted by on Dec 28, 2012 in Case Studies, Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 44 comments

Music Licensing Challenge: How Many Placements Will I Get In 90 Days?

  I participated in Aaron Davison’s 90 Day Music Licensing Challenge” Jan/2013 This is a case study in which I document my every move throughout the length of the course. You’ll see everything from the gear and music applications I use, down to my work ethics (everything!). Just one guy, a simple music production setup and a licensing course. – No mastering engineers, no sessions players …None of that My goal here is not only to educate, but to inspire those who are either in or thinking of getting into music licensing and the only way to do this is by being transparent, not just with success, but with mistakes and failure as well.     Music Licensing Challenge Video Transcription Hey guys, This is Greg from www.DiyMusicBiz.com and I just wanted to tell you about the case study I’ll be doing on a music licensing course made by Aaron Davidson called ‘The 90 Day Music Licensing Challenge’. What Aaron does in the 90 Day Challenge is take some body from ground zero, someone with no experience, or very little experience with music licensing, and helps them get their music licensed. So, I think that doing a case study on this will be good, because, people who are new often get frustrated. And I think it would be good to showed them how a real person goes about putting forth his methods into action. How they take frustration how, how they take success, what they’re doing on a day to day, how they’re actually abiding to the plan and the work flow and I also think it’d be really good inspiration. Another good thing would be to give Aaron a really good testimonial for his product. I don’t think there is many people doing case studies on music training/music business products, so I’d like to be the 1st one. I’m going to have to step outside of my comfort zone and set aside my biases, I know we have two different work flows, so it will be a learning experience for sure. Now I primarily stick to instrumentals and I know Aaron does a mix of instruments and vocals. He also runs his own pitch company and has a publisher. So if you are into this and you think it’s something you want to follow along and stay in-tuned with go to http://DiyMusicBiz.com, subscribe to the news letter. The updates wont be shared on YouTube… Only the newsletter. If you want to for some reason want to join The 90 Day Challenge (for yourself) go to www.howtolicenseyourmusic.com, that’s Aaron’s site, hopefully I got the address right. Other than that, please do subscribe, pass this video along. Feel free to contact me via email or my YouTube channel. You can me any questions you may have and please let me know what topics you would live me to cover in the future. Don’t forget to subscribe, this way you can get all the future updates to this case study   More Posts In The 90 Day Music Licensing Challenge Series 001: I’m already behind/studio gear being used (1/06/2013) 002: Finally Caught Up/Licensing Contracts (1/16/13) 003: Music Licensing Success After 1 month? (2/05/2013) 004: Payments Finally Cleared! (02/21-2013) 005 : Tying Up Loose Ends/Cd Submissions (03/12/13) 006: My Music Demos Were Rejected!? (03/23/13) 007: Music Licensing...

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Getting Your Music Placed In Video Games

Posted by on Dec 19, 2012 in Diymb Blog, Music Licensing, Sound Design | 7 comments

Getting Your Music Placed In Video Games

  Sorry no intro, let’s get right down to business Know What You’re Getting Into The most important thing you need to do is familiarize yourself with the gaming industry. You want to learn as much as you can about the company you plan on pitching to. What kind of music is used for “x type” of game? Is it mostly instrumentals or full songs? What genre of music do they use (mostly)? Look at the companies franchise games. I would never send the music supervisor of John Madden Celtic music…. It just doesn’t fit the game. I personally research game titles that use styles of music I enjoy creating. If I’ve never played the game I do a quick search on YouTube, and most of the time I’ll find someone paying the game, which allows me to hear some of the music that’s being used. If that doesn’t work, I’ll go into a EB Games or something and play the game. Most of the time the employees have a demo they can call up or even a kiosk with the latest games preloaded. Most will be demos, but that’s all you need.   The gaming industry loves working with Indie musicians Somewhere in between the acts of creation and communication an Urban Legend was born. This Urban Legend claims that gaming developers are only interested in  known artists/musicians. This isn’t 100% true, I do believe within the creation process there maybe some ideas/thoughts of having a certain piece of music to go along with the game, but if the music fits, the music fits (regardless who the creator is). In my experience, indie musicians have just as good of a chance of being placed as the majors – Given the music is of the same caliber production.   Build A Resume/Track Record Before you contact anyone make sure you have a portfolio of your work. This portfolio can be full songs, instrumentals or previous game placements. I suggest displaying any previous gaming placements/film work that you’ve done over the years. Sounds great Greg, but I have no prior game or video placements Well, now it’s time to focus on getting some. Start connecting with smaller game developers, these guys are always in need of sounds/music for their video games. They don’t always have the biggest budgets (for music) and in some cases can’t afford to pay anything, but hey, it’s a start. This will help you put together a nice portfolio that you can share with bigger companies/bigger clients (Midway, EA etc). Another thing you can do is strip and replace the audio from an in game clip. This is a fun exercise, it allows you to see how your sound fits inside of the game, and it’s a quick way to build a demo reel.   Make Your Music/Portfolio Easily Accessible You want to make sure your music is accessible and easy to listen to. What I mean is present something streamable rather than something that must be downloaded…unzipped/unrared and then played. I know that’s not a lot of work, but music supervisors/audio directors etc… These are very busy people, and you have to take that into consideration. They’re nice enough to converse with you and willing to hear your music… make it easy for them to do...

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