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Music Licensing Info

My Top 5 Music Licensing Companies (Libraries) – Money Making Machines!

Posted by on Dec 14, 2012 in Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 25 comments

My Top 5 Music Licensing Companies (Libraries)  – Money Making Machines!

  So you have your songs ready, you’re signed up with a PRO (that fits your needs), but now the question is “which music libraries are worth my time and effort.” httpvh://youtu.be/I3SHrrR0cmQ None of them are a waste of time (imo) they just cater to different people. Some people are ok with giving up a set % of their publishing or paying a membership fee (or submission fee) to submit their music to projects. I can’t tell you which music library is right for you, there are lots of different tiers, but I can tell you about 5 that are responsible for most of my income (when it comes to licensing). Watch in 720p for better video quality…..720p people CMON! 🙂 Music Licensing Companies Below are a few things you need to know about music libraries before joining. What Do Music Licensing Companies Do? They play the middle man between music creator and music buyer. Music libraries have a system/platform that allows media creators to search and purchase music for their projects. Some of these companies take a chunk of your profits for using their platform other’s don’t Where Can I Find Music Libraries? Look online, they’re everywhere. If you need a step by step “how to” on finding music licensing companies to submit music to, then join my free music business essentials course – Music Biz Essentials How Much Money Can I Make Using Music Licensing Companies I call this the “hot dog stand” question. It depends on how many music libraries you’re with, how many songs get placed and what your percentage is. If you never get a placement, then you make nothing....

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Disadvantage Of Licensing Your Music W/ Soundcloud/GettyImages

Posted by on Nov 19, 2012 in Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 24 comments

Disadvantage Of Licensing Your Music W/ Soundcloud/GettyImages

  Today I’m going over the disadvantages of licensing your music with Getty Images & Soundcloud. Keep in mind the info shared is accurate to date of the video. For those of you who missed the 1st video titled Soundcloud – Music Licensing & Pumpaudio < Just follow that link . httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AI5s0Dhy98   In this video I talk about the following Soundcloud Getty Images Meta Tagging Quality Control Share this video and if you have questions please use the comment section...

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Soundcloud – Music Licensing & Pumpaudio

Posted by on Oct 31, 2012 in Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 30 comments

Soundcloud – Music Licensing & Pumpaudio

I’m starting to get a lot of emails and questions on Skype about Music Licensing and the best ways to go about getting placements in: Film, Video Games, TV Commercials etc So rather than replying to everyone individually I thought “hey, why not make a video!?” – So, um…. that is what I done did 🙂   In this video I talk about the following Music Licensing Soundcloud (business merger) Pumpaudio (acceptance time) Getty Image Music (Buy out) Why You Need Soundcloud   Disadvantages Using Soundcloud & Getty Images/Pumpaudio I hope you find this video beneficial (share it!), I’m in the process of creating a few more as we speak. If you have any questions please leave them in the comment section below...

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Understanding The Differences Between ASCAP and BMI? You’ll Need One To Collect Royalties

Posted by on Sep 18, 2012 in Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 73 comments

Understanding The Differences Between ASCAP and BMI? You’ll Need One To Collect Royalties

  ASCAP vs BMI, which is better? We can all agree this popular question amongst many artists, producers and writers who are new to the business side of music. Here’s what generally happens: As a music creator you may have stumbled across an article, video or some type of seminar that spoke about an artist or producer getting their music placed and multimedia, generally film or TV sometimes even video games. From there you conduct research and find out that that you need to be signed up with a performance rights organizations in order to collect royalty payments. That research will lead you to two major companies, BMI and ASCAP. Both do the exact same thing, but slightly different. Your next question is: “Which is best for me BMI or ASCAP?” So you continue researching only to find yourself confused by the hundreds of articles and debates involving the two corporations, but no definite answer about which PRO is better. Does this sound familiar? Here’s why: In order to have a semi accurate answer, you’ll need to track a broad portion of users from both agencies (which isn’t realistic). You need data such as: number of gigs, which venues, times cue sheets were sent, stations that licensed your music, times of air play, length of air play etc. All those little factors make a huge difference and without them, debates are a waste of time. Now, the intent of this post is not to start another debate, but to educate, giving you what you need to make your own decision. Before I go into the Pros and Cons of each PRO, I’ll explain what a performing rights organization is.   Lets get started:   What Is a Performing Rights Organization?   A performing rights organization (PRO for short) is company who’s sole purpose is to collect it’s members royalties. These members consist of, artists, composers, producers, publishers etc. Once the royalties are collected, the PRO takes their fee and then sends the remaining amount to the member(s) (writer, publisher and so on). PRO’s collect royalties from establishments such as: retail stores, TV networks, video game companies, film companies, restaurant chains and any other franchise that uses music in their place of business. The method of tracking this activity is done through the use of cue sheets. Cue sheets are documents that outline: songs used, how long, when, by who and so on. It’s similar to an invoice, once that cue sheet is filled out it has to be sent to the respective PRO. Pretty high tech tracking method right? Feel free to ask me any question(s) you may have about PROs and how they operate, I’ve been doing this for years and have tons of experience with them..   What Is ASCAP Who Are They   ASCAP stands for “American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers”. It’s a performing rights organization that contains over 430,000 members throughout the United States. ASCAP was created in 1914 by a group of writers/composers and till this day, is still operated by it’s own members. In fact, it’s the only PRO in the US that is run by it’s members, and broad members are elected from within. ASCAP’s primary goal is to make sure their members are compensated for the use of their creations. Some of the biggest names in...

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10 Ways To Get Your Music Licensed In Film,TV & Video Games

Posted by on Sep 11, 2012 in Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 7 comments

10 Ways To Get Your Music Licensed In Film,TV & Video Games

  Music Producers, Song Writers, Music Composers, Session Players….They all have the same question and that is “How do I got about getting my music licensed?“. Well in all honesty it’s quite easy to do, I like to think people over complicate the process because they are truly afraid of and or unfamiliar with the field .. I’m sure there are other reasons, but those are the ones I notice. So what I’m going to do is provide a few tips on getting your music licensed   Here are a few ways to get your music licensed   1) Make Friends With People In The Film Industry I strongly suggest you make it your mission to meet older producers. Older, more experienced producers have been where you are and they have a lot of knowledge to pass down. Some of them even have younger siblings in the industry that they can and will connect you with if you play your cards right – It’s all about who you know   2) Have An Instrumental Version Of Everything 70% of all music that is licensed are instrumentals. If you don’t have instrumental versions of your songs…get them! If you’re not a tech savvy individual then have someone who is go through your material and create the instrumental version for you. The next time you’re recording at the studio just have the recording engineer (or who ever is recording you) bounce down a version of the song without the vocals.   3) Pay Attention To The Gaming Industry The video game industry has been and still is a fast expanding market. You’re going to want to get in touch with both ‘game developers’ as well as music supervisors. Make sure you approach them in a very respectable manner. Tell them who you are, what kind of music you make and what you are trying to do with your music. Ask, them what projects they may have underway and what type of music they are after. Make sure you have a demo on hand just in case they contact you asking for such. NEVER EVER SPAM and make sure you’re patient, sometimes it takes weeks for companies to get back with you regarding inquiry.   4) Provide Stock Library Music (It’s Profitable) Sign up with 3rd party stock music companies. There are a lot of companies out there for you to choose from but the ones I’ve had the most success with are: Taxi, Pumpaudio and Rumblefish. Some companies will charge you a fee in order for you to submit while other’s will simply split the royalties and or upfront licensing fee per placement that they land for you. The big plan here is once you’ve had a few placements through these companies you then contact the company (that licensed the music) directly and build a relationship and skip the middle man (in some case). Building a relationship with a publisher is also a good thing to do.   5) Find & Network With Music Publishers Speak with some publishers directly – You can find publisher fairly quickly using the internet. These days everyone has an email, facebook, twitter or some kind of social platform you can contact them on. Publishers are always looking for new talent to work with. What I...

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What Is A Music Supervisor

Posted by on Sep 11, 2012 in Diymb Blog, Music Licensing | 2 comments

What Is A Music Supervisor

  A music supervisor is a person who is in charge of finding and placing and or linking music with multimedia based projects IE: Film, Television shows, video games, documentaries etc. Some supervisors are known to have their own private practice while others work for a well established company such as: HBO, A&E, Paramount pictures or any other huge media based company you can think of.   What Does A Music Supervisor Do?   Music supervisors will generally converse with the movie directors, producers and or the whole film team in order to get a clear understanding of what type of music is needed for the project. Sometimes the producers or directors may already have a list of songs they want and other times, they just know the overall mood and emotion they’re after. The next task is to find the music that will fit the demands on the project and begin negotiating terms of the license. With that being said, it’s not uncommon for the music supervisor to go out and physically hire musicians/composers to get the job done. Last is the final approval, which could take weeks, months even a year. Final approval of music isn’t complete until the film is complete. Sometimes the film industry is nice enough to fish for music once the film is near completion and other times not so much.    Being A Music Supervisor Isn’t Easy   Music supervisors are the middle man when it comes to the negotiating. Composers/artists/music producers tend to think that companies can afford to pay top dollar for music so they get greedy and over charge. What is not understood is even though a company may have a 12 million dollar budget, only a small fraction of that is used for music. You have to understand; actors, writers, makeup artist and others are all being paid from the same budget. It’s the supervisors job to find a happy median for both parties (project & music creators) and make the deal work. This is not always an easy task. On top of negotiations there is a deadline that has to be met which adds even more stress into the equation. Paperwork, contracts, price negotiation, duration of use etc has to all be done within a small time frame (most of the time).   Music Supervisor’s Pay Rate   Most music supervisors are paid a flat rate for their services. They can be paid anywhere from a few thousand dollars to a few hundred thousand dollars, it just depends on the budget of the project and how successful that project is. There are also times when the supervisor can negotiate his or her own royalty payment structure in which they receive a negotiated amount/percentage of the placed song once the project has passed its expected numbers.   Becoming A Music Supervisor   Like any other career in music there isn’t one way to get there. In order to be a successful music supervisor you are going to need to understand a great deal about music licensing as well as bits of about each industry that uses music. It always helps to take some music business classes as well as have experience under your belt. Networking and making connections in the industry is vital if you can get an internship that would...

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